Informações da Disciplina

 Preparar para impressão 
Júpiter - Sistema de Graduação

Faculdade de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas
 
História
 
Disciplina: FLH0133 - History of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States

Créditos Aula: 5
Créditos Trabalho: 1
Carga Horária Total: 105 h
Tipo: Semestral
Ativação: 01/01/2016 Desativação:

Objetivos
Overview and objectives

Note: This course is for students with a minimum of upper-intermediate English listening, reading, oral and written skills. If you have any doubts, please speak to the professor before the course begins.
The civil rights movement was one of the most significant social movements in the history of the twentieth century with a continuing influence on American society and important impacts on a world scale. The study of the civil rights movements constitutes one of the most vibrant and innovative areas of current historiographical investigation. This course aims to introduce students to the principal themes and historiographical debates in the history of the civil rights movement. We pay close attention to wider historical contexts such as the legacy of slavery and the nature of American capitalism and racial formation, the roles of organizations, leadership, ideology, political culture, class relations and gender.
 
 
 
Docente(s) Responsável(eis)
5775421 - Robert Sean Purdy
 
Programa Resumido
Summary of the Course Outline

This course aims to introduce students to the principal themes and historiographical debates in the history of the civil rights movement in the United States. It will pay close attention to wider historical contexts such as the legacy of slavery and the nature of American capitalism and racial formation, the roles of organizations, leadership, ideology, political culture, class relations and gender. The readings, lectures and discussions will cover the origins and key events and actors of the movement as well as historiographical debates.
 
 
 
Programa
Content

1. Contexts, Concepts and Contestations: Mapping the Field
2. Origins I
3. Origins II
4. Brown vs Board, the Emmett Till case and the Montgomery Bus Boycott
5. Cities, Suburbs, and the Practice of Democracy
6. Sit-Ins, Freedom Rides and the Emergence of a Mass Movement
7. Non-Violence Tested: the Albany and Birmingham Campaigns
8. The Campaign for Citizenship: Mississippi, Selma and the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts
9. Gendering the Movement
10. The Chicago Freedom Movement and the Poor People’s Campaign
11. The Roots of Black Power
12. The Meanings of Black Power
13. Movement Cultures
14. Martin and Malcolm: Approximations
15. Consequences and Interpretations
 
 
 
Avaliação
     
Método
Teaching methodology

Required readings. Lectures, films and discussion of texts.
Critério
Evaluation

Attendance, required readings, participation in discussions, completion of essay and final exam.
70% minimum attendance. Use of the Moodle USP site for the course. Required readings in English. Participation in discussions in English. One essay (in English or Portuguese) and a final exam (in Portuguese or English). It is necessary to hand in both the essay and final exam to pass in the course.
Norma de Recuperação
Recuperation

According to the resolution COG 3583 of 29/09/89, students will have a right to recuperation if they attended a minimum of 70% of the classes and achieve a mark of 3,0 (three). The evaluation will be a written exam.
 
Bibliografia
     
BIBLIOGRAPHY

ALEXANDER, Michele. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. New York: The New Press, 2012.

ARSENAULT, Raymond. Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

BRANCH, Taylor. Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954-1963. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1996.

CARSON, Clayborne et. al. (eds.) The Eyes on the Prize Civil Rights Reader: Documents, Speeches, and Firsthand Accounts from the Black Freedom Struggle. New York: Penguin, 1991.

DU BOIS, W.E.B. The Souls of Black Folks. New York: Dover, 1994 [1903].

FAIRCLOUGH, Adam. “Was Martin Luther King a Marxist?,” History Workshop, n. 15 (Spring 1983): 117–25.

FAIRCLOUGH, Adam. Better Day Coming: Blacks and Equality, 1890-2000. London: Penguin Books, 2002.

HALEY, Alex. The Autobiography of Malcolm X: As Told to Alex Haley. New York: Ballantine Books, 1992 [1964].

HALL, Jacquelyn Dowd. “The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past”. The Journal of American History. Vol.91, n.4, March 2005.

HAMPTON, Henry and FAVER, Steve. Voices of Freedom: An Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement from the 1950s through the 1980s. New York: Bantam, 1991.

JOSEPH, Peniel. Waiting Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America. New York: Holt, 2007.

LOEWEN, James. Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your High-School History Textbook Got Wrong. New York: The New Press, 2008 [1995].

MARABLE, Manning. Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention. New York: Penguin, 2011.

PAINTER, Nell Irvin. Creating Black Americans: African American History and Its Meanings, 1619 to the Present. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

SINGH, Nikhil Pal. Black Is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2004.

SUGRUE, Thomas J. Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North. New York: Random House, 2008.

SUGRUE, Thomas J. The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit (Updated Edition). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2014.

TAKAKI, Ronald. Double Victory: A Multicultural History of America in World War II. New York: Backbay Books, 2000.

ZINN, Howard. A People’s History of the United States. New York: Harper, 2005 [1980].
 

Clique para consultar os requisitos para FLH0133

Clique para consultar o oferecimento para FLH0133

Créditos | Fale conosco
© 1999 - 2017 - Superintendência de Tecnologia da Informação/USP